Open Source GIS software and Remote Sensing for Ecologists

Why remote sensing? Sure there’s something odd about satellites looking down on us everyday, a bit unsettling from a socio-political perspective. But from an ecological perspective, its a game changer, in a very good way.

Since the 1970s, NASA has been recording the earths surface at a resolution of about 1km. Thats large enough to see landscape change, but too blurry to see humans moving around.

And what can we see with these images? How about glaciers melting in the Northern Hemisphere, and glaciers expanding in the Southern Hemisphere. Or the landscape change in the region you grew up in as a kid. Continue reading “Open Source GIS software and Remote Sensing for Ecologists”

Finally! The manuscript for the Lichens of the Turnbull National Wildlife Refuge is being written…

After three years of field work in Argentina, Chile, the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain, and the Great Basin Desert of Nevada, we’re finally making the time to publish the Turnbull NWR lichen inventory.

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Our home lab/herbarium here in Reno is getting mighty, um, what is the word for it… mightly something. Let just leave it as mighty.

The manuscript is going to be more bare boned than we’d imagined it at the beginning of the project, but Jason and I are planning on following-up with subsequent papers that address more of the ecologically significant aspects while widening our scope outside the refuge.

For this round, the manuscript is going to be taxonomically focused, noting where our specimens stray from the species concept, minor notes on habitat and ecology, and a brief discussion of conservation. And a lot of new reports for the state of Washington, and a number of interesting reports and/or range extensions. Continue reading “Finally! The manuscript for the Lichens of the Turnbull National Wildlife Refuge is being written…”