About me

Nastassja teaching a group of sub-antarctic researchers and a Chilean documentary team about the ecology of lichens and bryophytes, Omora Ethnobotanical Park, UNESCO Cape Horn Biosphere Reserve, Puerto Williams, Chile, March 2013.
Nastassja teaching a group of Sub-Antarctic researchers and a Chilean documentary team about the ecology of lichens and bryophytes at Omora Ethnobotanical Park, UNESCO Cape Horn Biosphere Reserve, Puerto Williams, Chile, March 2013. Photo by Daniel Casado.

Curl Page BreakMy name is Nastassja Noell and I’m an emerging lichenologist by trade and training, with interests in biodiversity studies, conservation, and the arts. These days, my interests are focused around the potential of using lichens as biomonitors of climate change. My current projects include lichen inventories on the ecotone between the Mojave and Great Basin ecoregions, as well as investigating how the Western North American alpine flora has changed over the past 60 years.

Jason and Nastassja upper Tropy meadows
Jason and Nastassja at Trophy Meadows, Wells Gray Provincial Park, B.C. Canada. Just who is this Jason guy that’s mentioned all the time in blog posts? Read on, you’ll find out just a smidge more!

You’ll notice throughout the site that there’s a lot of mentions about a mysterious partner named Jason. That refers to the creative, energetic and insightful rogue lichenologist, Jason Hollinger. His photographs form the basis of many of the images shown on this site, as do many of his insights in lichen taxonomy, ecology and geology help shape my understanding of the worlds we find ourselves in. All errors are mine alone, but credit for many of the unadulterated photographs ought to be given to Jason Hollinger, Creative Commons License; the oversaturation of color of most photos is my special gift for better or worse. If you’d like to contact me, there’s a form at the bottom of this page.

PUBLICATIONS

Lendemer, J.C. and N. Noell. 2018. Lichens of the Delmarva Peninsula. An Illustrated Manual. 386 pages. Torrey Botanical Society.

Noell, N. 2016. “Chapter 5: Radical Lichenology.” In Radical Mycology by Peter McCoy, Chthaeus Press 111-142.

Lendemer, J. C., Allen, J., and Noell, N. 2015. “The Parmotrema acid test: a look at species delineation in the P. perforatum group 40 years later.” Mycologia, 14-263.

Noell, N. and J. Hollinger. 2015. “Alpine Lichens and Climate Change on Wheeler Peak.” The Midden: The Resource Management Newsletter of Great Basin National Park, 15:1.

Noell, N. 2014. “Island in the Sky: Hiking Hurricane Ridge, Olympic National Park.” Northwest Travel Magazine, August issue.

Noell, N. 2014. “Omora Ethnobotanical Park: Changing Lenses, The Miniature Forests of Cape Horn.” Patagon Journal, Summer issue.

Moses, K.P., N. Noell, D. Casado, R. Rijal, Y. Medina, L.R. Lewis, M. Mendez, P.P. Caballero, V. Morales, A.M. Wilson and P. Vezzani. 2013. Ecotourism with a hand lens in the Miniature Forests of Cape Horn: A sustainable pathway for bryophyte conservation.  Conference paper, 98th ESA Annual Convention.

Malonga, K. R. Kinslow, B. Gross, and N. Noell. 2011. “Including environmental and social sustainability in Mining Policy: Suggestions for the Ghanaian Mining Commission.” Unpublished report to the Ghanaian Environmental Protection Agency Division of Mining.

PRESENTATIONS

Noell, N. November 2016. “Alpine Lichens and Climate Change – 1955 to present: Preliminary results from Mt. Whitney, Kearsarge Pass and Bishop Pass.” Sequoia and Kings Canyon Science Symposium, Three Rivers, CA.

Noell, N. May 2015. “Biological Soil Crusts: What are they, why are they important, and how to classify them using the BLM’s AIM methods.” Presentation to the Great Basin Institute field crews in Nevada, Wyoming and Washington; University of Nevada Reno Herbarium.

Noell, N. and J. Hollinger. October 2014. “Lichens of the Turnbull National Wildlife Refuge.” Presentation to the Washington Native Plants Society; Spokane, WA.

Noell, N. October 2014. “Introduction to Lichens: Ethics, Tricks, & Tips.” Presentation and workshop for the 3rd Annual International Radical Mycology Convergence, Orangeville, IL.

Noell, N. October 2014. “Reading the landscape: Lichens as Environmental Bioindicators.” Presentation and workshop for the 3rd Annual International Radical Mycology Convergence, Orangeville, IL.

Noell, N. February 2014. “Lichens of the Delmarva Peninsula: Refugium for the Anthropocene?” Presentation to the New York Botanical Gardens Science Seminar Series; Bronx, NY.

Noell, N., J.L. Allen, J. Hollinger, and R. O’Quinn. July 2013. “Lichens of the Channelled Scablands: Turnbull National Wildlife Refuge.” Poster presentation, Botany 2013 conference; New Orleans, LA.

Malonga, K., R. Kinslow, B. O’Gross, and N. Noell. July 2011. “Including environmental and social sustainability in Mining Policy: Suggestions for the Ghanaian Mining Commission.” Presentation to the Ghanaian Environmental Protection Agency’s Division of Mining and the Ghana Chamber of Mines; University of Ghana, Accra.

GRANTS AND HONORARY SCHOLARSHIPS

2016. California Lichen Society Grant. $1000 for Alpine Lichens and Climate Change.

2014. National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program Grant. Attempted for Alpine Lichens and Climate Change project.

2012. Washington State Native Plant Society. $600 for Lichens of the Turnbull National Wildlife Refuge.

2012. Evergreen State College Student Foundation Grant. $200 for Lichens of the Turnbull National Wildlife Refuge.

2011. Emerging Leaders in Environment and Extraction Program, Duquesne University, University of Ghana, and the U.S. State Department, July 2011. Full honorary scholarship, $3,800.

EDUCATION

1999-2000: Hampshire College, Amherst, Massachusetts.  Focus: Cognitive Neuroscience.

2001-2005: DePaul University, Chicago, Illinois. B.A. in Political Science with a minor in Media and Communications.

2011-2013: Evergreen State College, Olympia, Washington. B.S. in Field Biology and Lichenology.

If you’d like to contact me: